Gender and Malaria

Gender and Malaria

For too long, the fight against malaria has been gender-blind. The global community has not consistently brought a gender lens to the fight against malaria—until now.

Ending malaria is an unrealized opportunity for advancing gender and health equity because it is preventable, treatable and beatable. By investing in malaria eradication, we can reduce maternal and child mortality, improve women’s empowerment and gender equality and bend the curve on poverty.

Anyone can get malaria, but women and adolescent girls bear the health, societal, and economic brunt of malaria, which thrives in the poorest, remote and rural communities, exacerbates poverty and deepens inequalities. As patients, caregivers and healthcare providers, the unique adverse ripple effects that women and adolescent girls experience due to malaria result in significant and long term health and economic costs for themselves, their families and their communities.

Though little-acknowledged, women in malaria-endemic countries also are the leading investors in the fight against malaria. They make up 70 percent of the community health workforce and, together with adolescent girls. are the greatest contributors in the informal “care economy.”

What is Malaria?

What is Malaria?

Malaria is a preventable and treatable infectious disease transmitted by mosquitoes that kills more than 400,000 people each year.

Take Action

Take Action

Whether you are an organisation or an individual, join us and take action this International Women's Day.

Resources

Resources

All the information, resources and guidance to support International Women's Day activities.

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